Vintage fender amplifier dating


27-Oct-2019 09:31

The tuxedo was the result of the ever-thrifty Leo Fender wanting to use up the remaining “brownface” Princeton Amp chassis and cabinets.Issued from mid-1963 to mid-1964, the tuxedo amps featured Blackface cosmetics, but were very snazzy looking with white barrel knobs.Certain words and phrases pique the interest of vintage guitar players and collectors worldwide, like “Burst,” “Blackguard,” “Plexi,” and “Blackface.” Named for their black control panels, Blackface Fender amps are one of the company’s most famous and coveted product series.Blackface Fender amps tend to be categorized into two groups by collectors and players: “Pre-CBS” (mid-1963 to mid-1965) models with a “Fender Electric Instrument Company” label and “CBS” (mid-1965 to mid-1968) models with a “Fender Musical Instrument” label.These amps, fondly referred to as the “lunch box,” were sold by the thousands to students and professionals alike.Immediately popular for studio use, they also found favor from musicians playing small gigs.

Still, with this amp, you get a lot of oomph and versatility in a compact and relatively light package.Tech Specs: Once again, Fender issued three distinct variants of the Princeton amp during the Blackface era: the transitional “tuxedo” model, as well as reverb and non-reverb models in the new “Princeton” style.Each version featured a single 10” speaker and about 12 watts of output.Overshadowed by the Princeton Reverb, which is widely considered one of the most famous studio amps ever built, the non-reverb Princeton is a sleeper hit.

Its existence in the shadow of its reverb-capable brother is a shame, as it offers some of the finest pure Fender tones you can find in a compact package.

Sometimes referred to as the “Baby Twin,” the Pro Reverb provided a lot of musical firepower and fit the bill in larger venues.